sicktonary dDaffy [Dahf-ee] noun: To spray an adaptive skier with snow, causing them to fall over.

 

Dangler [dang-glers] noun An article such as a headband, t-shirt, rug, quilt, pelt, cell phone, crucifix, or pentagram that hangs off of your outfit while riding. There is a very thin line between steeze and cheeze.

 

Dead Man’s Click [Dehd Mahns Klik] verb: Called a “ping” in the US, a “Dead Man’s Click” is when the tip of your snowboard hits a rail as you ollie up onto it. When James Bond points his gun at a bad guy only to pull the trigger and find out he’s out of ammo. The Dead Man’s Click…

 

Death Cookie [Deth Kuk-e] noun Tasty ice-ball remnants left behind by agitated graveyard-shift groomers and avalanches. Often found on landings, lurking in the flat light of a rail, trail edge, or your BVD’s after an improper backcountry dumping.

 

Decal [Dee-kahl] noun: Though now commonly referred to as stickers, decals first became popular as a way to adhere graphics to surfaces which couldn’t directly be printed on. Once the hobby shops that catered to hot-rodders and model-toy enthusiasts started selling skateboards, they continued to advertise their Vato Rat and OJII stickers as “decals.”

 

Deck (Dehk) noun: The flat area extending out from the lip of a halfpipe or quarterpipe. “Decking out” or “decking” is when a rider miscalculates their loft from the lip and ends up coming down outside the feature. The deck is also the area of a halfpipe that snowboarders use to hike back up to the top.

 

The Deep Spot [Thuh Deeeep Spaht] noun: A phrase that came about this year for our guys. The landing spot for the real heroes that exists somewhere between the sweet spot and the overshot.

 

Detachable [Dee-tach-ib-uhl] adj: Any lift that enables the chairs to be removed from the main cable to change its momentum during loading and unloading. The best part about detachable chairs is that they don’t want a long-term commitment.

 

Dicks on Sticks [Dihkkz Ahn Stihkkz] noun: Skiers.

 

Digger[dig-Grrrrr] noun An underpaid employee who shapes jumps and pipes in snowboard parks. They usually travel in packs and scare all things undiggerly with their rakes and sweet-ass tans. The outsiders of snowboard camps. Watch for huge biceps, big balls, cheap wieners, and tats. DFL—Diggers For Life! Mt. Hood is a volcanic glacier. Look carefully in the ice now and you might find your ancestors, or Dave Dowd.

 

DIN [Dihn] noun: The amount of energy used by the electromagnets in a ski binding. The higher the DIN setting, the more energy is released from the batteries, in turn requiring more torque to cause the binding to disengage.

 

Directional [di-rek-shuh-nl] adjective A snowboard that is designed to favor forward riding capabilities.

 

Disc [disk] noun The round disc that rests on a binding’s baseplate. It houses the mounting screws and can be rotated to yield a plethora of binding stance options. Installation experts are called Disc Jockeys.

 

Dodgy, Dicey [Dahj-ee, Dihcee] adj: When something looks sketchy. “Those skiers are dodgy!”

 

The Dog’s Bollocks [Thuh Dahgs Bahl-uhks] phrase: …which is something great. “Man, that 720 was the dog’s bollocks.” (Dog’s nuts, dog’s danglies)

Dompe [Dohmp] noun, verb: That would refer to anything that sucks. Anything.

 

Donkeys: [Dong-keeez] adj: Idiots!

 

Donkey Dick [dong-ke dik] noun A short, flat extension on the end of a handrail. Or, a short round extendable nub near the testes of a burro. Both can f**k you up.

 

Doubtfit [Doutfiht] noun: When one is wearing a questionable outfit.

 

Double Cork [Dub-buhl Kork] adj A trick in which a rider spins  off-axis for two complete rotations before touching down. This trick was popularized by Travis Rice’s double-cork 1080 over the Pyramid Gap in 2005, and then taken to the next level by David Benedek when he stomped a double-cork 1260 at the Air & Style the following year. Still, some argue that JP Walker’s 2003 Shakedown signature stunt is a double cork, in which case it predates Rice and Benedek’s innovations.

 

Down (Dow-nuh): Comforters and warm jackets are filled with these soft, delicate goose feathers, often found on the baby fowl. When riders go to really cold climates, they go “down.” When crackheads need a fix, they go “down.” That is fowl.

 

Down Time (Dow-nuh Tie-muh): The periods during snowboarding when you aren’t actively pursuing the most epic shots. Oftentimes, this leads to…

 

Drop In [drop in] preposition To enter a runway or halfpipe. Riders often announce this to those above and below by bellowing “Dropping!”

 

Drunk Driver [druhngk drahy-ver] noun A mute and stalefish double grab.

 

Duck [duhk] noun A stance which incorporates both feet facing outward towards a board’s nose and tail.

 

Duct Tape[duhk-teyp]noun Gray adhesive tape that can be used to add support to boots, mend delaminated topsheets, attach gear to the roof of a car, subdue the unwilling, and fix anything else that needs a convenient, durable connection.

 

Dump[duhmp] verb Large amounts of snow falling in thick waves. It’s okay to get Mother Nature’s Cleveland Steamer.

 

Dust on Crust [dust on krust] noun A thin layer of new snow on top of a firmer snowpack, causing the illusion of conditions being better than they truly are. Cougars applying makeup is the personification of said term.