LONG EXPOSURE

Mike Yoshida

The riders who have most influenced his snowboard photography.

Being a self taught photographer, I needed a lot of outside help to learn my craft. Coming up, I would frequently would ask other more established photographers for tips. I always studied every photo that I saw in every magazine that I could get my hands on, and figure out why I liked certain shots over others. When I finally reached the level where I was shooting with professionals, it was the riders who motivated me, and taught me a lot about shooting. Here is a list of my favorite snowboarders who helped influence me as a photographer, and shaped how I went about documenting action and lifestyle.

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Jesse Burtner

Growing up in Alaska, I had always heard Jesse’s name within the snowboard scene. My friends would always come back from Girdwood raving about Burtner, Richie Fowler, Jesse Cross and a whole slew of up and coming rippers. Jesse was one of the elite that made it out of Alaska in pursuit of his professional snowboarding career. I had always been a fan of Burtner’s riding, so when I first met him at High Cascade Snowboard camp circa 2003, I was in awe. A couple years later I asked him if he needed a photographer on one of his shoots, and to my surprise he let me tag along and document the crew. That was the second year of Think Thank, and it’s all history from there. Jesse was highly influential in the fact that he was really excited to get a photo alongside his video shot. A lot of riders only care about the video shot, and that can really make it difficult to create the photo that you envision. Burtner’s hard work ethic and love for snowboarding was infectious, and you can really see that in his movies, and at any spot that he shows up at.

| That was the second year of Think Thank, and it’s all history from there. |

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Wille Yli Luoma

I was the staff photographer for K2 Snowboards from 2006-2010. During that time, I became friends with the team, and one of my favorites to shoot with was Wille. Not only was he always trying to do the craziest tricks, but he had this attitude that he was going to get whatever he wanted in life, and nothing was going to stop him. It showed through in his snowboarding, and it has also shined through in his post shred endeavors as a coffee hustler. There is no doubt in my mind that Wille will be the best at in whatever he wants. On top of that, he was a really talented photographer, so he always new what would shoot well, and would even suggest angles that he would see. Wille’s influence was in his work ethic, and also never knowing when to give up. Some of our best shots were the last ones at the end of the day, when the crew was totally over it. I am very grateful for having to shoot with such an iconic rider up until he decided to bow out of the scene.

 

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Scott Stevens

I met Scott during the year that Patchwork Patterns came out. I think that was close to 10 years ago. My first impression about Scott was that he always tried really hard at what he did. Some may consider his tricks to be gimmicky and easy, but in reality it takes hundreds of tries for him to do the trick the way he wants to. Several tries after I thought he had gotten the trick he wanted, he kept trying over and over again, because he always has had a good vision of exactly how he wants his snowboarding to look. Shooting with Scott taught me to always have the camera running, no matter how ridiculous the snowboarding seemed, because you never know when he’s going to do another NBD feat.

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| because honestly not much has changed, he still sends it in life, every day |

Pat McCarthy

At an early age McCarthy was very business minded. When it came down to proposals and negotiations, Pat was willing to go the extra mile to make sure his sponsors were happy. His business skills motivated me to have good communication with the media outlets, and also to manage my time and money. On the hill Pat gives 110%. Whether it was pre-building a jump for the next day, or laying down that extra layer of blocks on the kicker to get to the good tranny, there was never any half stepping out there. Watching how Pat really taught me how to work hard and play hard. We are still really good friends, and its been refreshing to see his transition into team managing, because honestly not much has changed, he still sends it in life, every day.

 

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Eero Niemala

Eero was the first rider to take me under his wing, and show me the ropes in the Whistler Backcountry. Whis can be one of the most treacherous places in the world if you aren’t with the right crew, so I was more than grateful to have Mikey Rencz, Eero, and Anthony Vitale teach me how to sled, and how to stay safe out there. During my first week sledding, I spent quite a few days digging out, and the crew had a lot of patience with my very rookie RMK 700.

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Aaron Robinson

Aaron Robinson was one of the greatest people I have ever met. His attitude towards life, and the way he interacted with people can be described as an overly infectious ball of positive energy. On and off the hill that energy was the best to be around. Aaron would push me to shoot different angles, and when I would be tired or totally over it, he would have a magical way of stoking me out and hiking further for that extra shot. His mentally was that of a person who is unstoppable in anything they want to do in life. For Aaron that unstoppable desire was to travel the world and shred at the highest level humanly possible. I believe he achieved that.

 

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Sean Genovese

Sean Genovese is a visionary. The amount of ideas that he has ongoing in that little black sketch book he carries around is ridiculous. Alongside being an amazing snowboarder, Geno is an amazing artist, and has become the marketing mind behind Dinosaurs Will Die. He is the epitomy of DIY everything, and I really respect what he has done in his career. When it comes to shooting, Geno will not only find the angle for you, but he will help you set up flashes, and try a trick 100 times until the photo is perfect. He’s pretty much a photographers dream.