P: Mike Yoshida

Sameness is so 2014. This winter, it’s all about outfitting your kit with gear that will compliment your own style. There is no better way to do this than to spend this season descending on a deck that is different than the rest. Rather than regurgitating “safe” shapes, companies have woken up to the axiom that riders are looking for adventure within their setup. Though each of the seven sticks hand-picked to be featured here comes with a different warranty, every one of them is guaranteed to to make your quiver quake. - Pat Bridges

P: Mike Yoshida

Burton Family Tree Skipjack Surf

Named after a type of sailboat developed for oyster dredging, the new Burton Skipjack is definitely worth shelling out for. The Skipjack’s shape is seemingly drawn from the same mold as Burton’s legendary Cruiser of the mid-80s, yet the Channel Mounting System, Dualzone EGD, Filex-O-Flex, and Carbon highlights make it easily apparent that this ain’t no retro ride. The Directional Flat Top camber profile combined with an exaggerated nose and notched swallowtail make the Skipjack a high tide machine. Meanwhile, factory installed traction pads are always at the ready for on-the-go, footloose snow surf adaptability. Below the surface, the Skipjack Surf is rife with materials true to Burton’s Green Mountain Process including an FSC-certified woodcore, recycled WFO sintered base and bio-rich super sap resin for bonding. All of this eco goodness and its aptitude for nimbly gliding amongst the glades is sure to turn every Family Tree-hugger into a Skipjack Surf-er. Burton.com MSRP: $599.95

P: Mike Yoshida

If you see a CAPiTA Spring Break Powder Hole in a liftline, on a tram, leaning up against a baselodge, at a heli port, or even on the roof rack of a car, find the owner and follow that person at all costs because the only place they’re heading is the steep, the deep and the wide open. From the avant-garde psyche of Corey Smith comes another piece of shredable art in the form of the Powder Hole. Shaped like a frozen water ski this elongated wedge narrows from tip to tail where a pill shaped cutout lays in wait without revealing if it is merely flair or somewhat functional. While the external traits of the Powder Hole might confound, it’s what’s under the topsheet that is guaranteed to astound. Like the rest of CAPiTA’s Spring Break series the Powder Hole features a Surflite core which achieves buoyancy by placing select blocks of balsa wood in a parquet pattern from tip to tail with beech and poplar strategically added to re-enforce the midsection and rails. Forged carbon diamond plates developed in partnership with Union bindings are used to anchor the inserts and add resiliency to the balsa because the only thing you’re gonna wanna break while riding the Powder Hole are all the rules! Capitasnowboarding.com MSRP:$679.95

P: Mike Yoshida

YES. 20/20

With the 20/20 the visionaries at YES. may have cracked the twin-tip swallowtail code. Few would argue that nothing beats a split tail for pure pow enjoyment. The ability to sink the stern and stand the nose up makes swallowtails the best option for open bowl, blower days. Of course, this sensation comes with a serious disadvantage. To put it simply, swallowtails suck riding switch. YES. approached this dilemma from all angles and came up with the 3D Powder Hull. Unlike other planks, which are drawn from a single contour when viewed in profile, the 20/20 has pronounced convex bows at the farthest reaches of the twin tip shovels. Inbounds, the 20/20 rides like a stubby, conventional freestyle twin. Once unleashed off-piste, the 20/20 becomes a bi-directional anomaly where both ends of the deck perform their powder-centric function forwards or backwards equally well, making the 20/20 the favorite ride of optometrists and out-of bounds boarders alike. Yesnowboard.com MSRP:$649.00

P: Mike Yoshida

Everyone knows that the name of this board stands for Deeper Understanding Hypothesis, duh! The tenacious tinkerers at Lib Technologies have once again come up with a dictum that is way off base. The underlying concept that drove the creation of the DUH is that there may be a simpler way to facilitate a snowboard riding faster by reducing friction while at the same time increasing control. What they came up with is less something new and more a reintroduction of something first brought to market a decade-and-a-half back by Hobie Snowboards with their Duel-E quad edge offering. Sadly, surf pioneer Hobie Alter the brand’s patriarch, passed away in 2014 and the snowboards he created left the market well before that. Not ones to let a potentially game-changing innovation be forgotten, Lib Technologies has created their own interpretation of this notion. The resulting DUH is built around what Lib calls Speed Lever Technology, which is basically a bi-level base with a roughly nine inch wide platform descending a few millimeters down along the deck’s center point complete with its own sidecut and inlaid edges. The upper level then extends conventionally out to the board’s traditional edge points. What Lib has going for it that the original Hobie examples didn’t is Magne-Traction, Banana Tech and a name for the board that people will take seriously, like DUH. Lib-tech.com MSRP: $899.95

P: Mike Yoshida

Smokin’ Buck 2.0

Though it may look more conservative than the rest of this roundup, upon closer inspection of the Smokin’ Buck 2.0, an obvious enigma becomes apparent. In an era where every company touts the advantages of their proprietary approach to asym design, Smokin’ has come out with a version that takes the theory in a whole new direction. With the Buck 2.0, regular footers and goofy footers are presented with cosmetically different shapes depending on their favored stance. For example, if you are a regular footer, you’ll see a small protrusion on the toeside of your tip with a more bulbous bulge on the heel. For regular footers, the vista is the opposite meaning that the toeside of the nose has a big bump and the heelside has a svelte peak. The same differentiation applies to the tail. Like most everything else about Smokin Snowboards whether or not the Buck 2.0 is regarded as ingenious or insane comes down to the simple a matter of how you look at it. Smokinsnowboards.com MSRP:$529.99

P: Mike Yoshida

Insiders at TransWorld have confessed that the only thing that kept the Lucas Magoon Block Father from winning one of their coveted Good Wood awards is the fact that this board just isn’t good, it’s evil! Though Lucas Magoon conjured the graphic identity, he gave SNOWBOARDER’s Creative Director Pat Bridges free reign to design the Block Father’s outline and technical specs and the result is what you’d expect from such a union. The nose dimensions alone are noteworthy, yet this form serves a purpose, as this is one coffin that will never get buried. Towards the rear, the tri-pointed butterfork is sure to keep all creepers at bay. Traditional camber underfoot combined with a flat kick nose profile and radial rise tail are just a few of the performance enhancing accouterments that prove there is more to the Killington Block Father than meets the eYe. Technine.com MSRP:$419.00