Louif Paradis interview

Louif Paradis

Louif Paradis

photo: Oli Gagnon

Louif Paradis

What are some snowboard films that resonate with you from before you were a pro snowboarder?

Vivid, by Absinthe. TB9 and TB10.

How did you hear about the film and how did you get involved to work on Resolution?

I got a phone call from Pat Bridges. He told me about the film and the riders involved in it and asked if I wanted to be a part of it, and of course I wanted to it.

Louif Paradis

photo: Oli Gagnon

How was your approach to filming for Resolution different from other projects you’ve worked on in the past?

It usually goes the same every winter but this year was different because I got to shred with riders I never usually get to ride with. That’s always a blast.

What were some of the highlights of your winter?

For sure going to Alaska with Jake Blauvelt, Mikey Rencz and Ben Ferguson, because I have always dreamed of riding more lines and I finally got to do it this winter. The mountains are impressive and beautiful up there. It’s just one of those places I want to snowboard.

What were some of the lowlights of your winter?

Nothing really, except the waiting game for snow and trying to figure out where to go. It can be a gamble, sometimes.

What was the craziest thing you saw in the streets or the backcountry while filming?

Bode Merrill warming up in AK.

Louif Paradis

photo: Mike Yoshida

Louif Paradis

Are you happy with the amount of footage that you’re sitting on?

I think I am considering the way the season went. I didn’t stress or took it too seriously but I still tried to get stuff every time I was riding.

Who was your main crew this winter?

I hopped around between crews, but my main Resolution crew was Harrison Gordon, Grenier and François.

Louif Paradis

What’s the best or craziest example of Frank “Franking” someone at a spot?

This winter, we were in a village for a week and the first spot we hit there, a cop rolls up to see what we’re doing, so Frank goes and talks to him. Next thing you know, it’s his old buddy from high school or something, and he’s a snowboarder himself. So for the rest of our stay there, if someone was to call the cops, that guy would just show up and talk to the person and give us some more time. Another time, at that wallride to lipslide spot, we knew that spot was becoming a bust, so we went and got it ready on a Saturday night (it’s a school) and the cops show up asking what we’re doing, saying the Principal of the school complained. So Frank asked the police if he could speak with the principal. The police called the principal back, Frank “Franked” him and we got permission to keep going.

Tell us the story of being stabbed in the chest.

We were riding this line in some back alley. I think Harrison should have a clip in his part from it. I was just waiting for my turn to film, lapping it and trying to figure it out before Colton Morgan was gonna follow me with the camera. And I was jamming up a big wood pole to backside 180 and landing on an angled fence. One time, my board slipped out on the outside. I landed on my butt on the pole and flipped backwards and taco’d the fence. Some sketchy rusty T-post stabbed me through all my layers in the armpit. I wasn’t sure I only had a scratch or what so I lifted up my first layer and there was a decent sized hole there! Frank drove me to the hospital and couple hours later I got stitches.

What are some snowboard films that resonate with you from before you were a pro snowboarder?

Decade, TB9, The Resistance, True Life, Destroyer, Happy Hour, The Gathering, Love/Hate, Burning Bridges, Afterbang, Lame, Afterlame, Escramble.

Louif Paradis

Louif Paradis

photo: Mike Yoshida

Louif Paradis

photo: Oli Gagnon

Louif Paradis

photo: Mike Yoshida

Louif Paradis

photo: Oli Gagnon

Louif Paradis

Was there a crew of local shredders? If so, were they street kids, resort kids or backcountry kids?

Locals there don’t have the luxury to go ride for fun that much. They have to work in town or on the mountain as an instructor or a guide. You’ll see local guides there making some money while shredding but that’s about it, I think. I could be wrong, but that’s what I observed. We met with one local shredder who was all interested but he was saying he couldn’t really go that often. We did go ride in a village and a let a bunch of little kids try our snowboards and they couldn’t stop playing with them; it was rad to see.

This was your first year in a few winters that you didn’t spend all of your time filming with Déjà Vu. How was it different?

With Déjà Vu, we are all really close friends who have similar mindsets and work ethic and all. We know each other really well too. This year I spent the season with a lot of new people, mainly younger riders. It made me feel old a lot of times, haha, but it was interesting in general.

You also went to Alaska for the first time ever. Talk about that experience.

Yeah, I got the invite to go to Haines with Bode, Hans Mindnich, Jon Ray and Oli Gagnon, and I had to go. Most of our time there was down days waiting for the clouds to crack open, but I really enjoyed the whole experience. Even just being up there and trying to fish and go on hikes. It’s one of the most beautiful places I’ve been for sure. We didn’t get many good days—two or three and from what I understand—they were okay days compared to better snow years.

Do you see yourself going back in coming winters?

I would like to, yes.

Would you ever make the transition to big mountain riding?

I mean, I could see myself getting really into it because it’s so challenging and learning all of that is like learning how to snowboard again, but I don’t know. I don’t feel like I have the background experience for it.

Ultimately, what did you want to get out of this video part?

Just some good clips, some tricks I haven’t done before.

Do you think you achieved it?

I think so.